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Blogs | RESEARCH | July 19, 2017

Multiple Critical Vulnerabilities Found in Popular Motorized Hoverboards

Not that long ago, motorized hoverboards were in the news – according to widespread reports, they had a tendency to catch on fire and even explode. Hoverboards were so dangerous that the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) issued a statement recommending consumers “look for indications of acceptance by recognized testing organizations” when purchasing the devices. Consumers were even advised to not leave them unattended due to the risk of fires. The Federal Trade Commission has since established requirements that any hoverboard imported to the US meet baseline…

Thomas Kilbride
Blogs | INSIGHTS | May 20, 2017

Post #WannaCry Reaction #127: Do I Need a Pen Test?

In the wake of WannaCry and other recent events, everyone from the Department of Homeland Security to my grandmother are recommending penetration tests as a silver bullet to prevent falling victim to the next cyber attack. But a penetration test is not a silver bullet, nor is it universally what is needed for improving the security posture of an organization. There are several key factors to consider. So I thought it might be good to review the difference between a penetration test and a vulnerability assessment since this is a…

Daniel Miessler
Blogs | RESEARCH | April 20, 2017

Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Vulnerabilities

By Tao Sauvage Last year I acquired a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi router, more specifically the EA3500 Series. I chose Linksys (previously owned by Cisco and currently owned by Belkin) due to its popularity and I thought that it would be interesting to have a look at a router heavily marketed outside of Asia, hoping to have different results than with my previous research on the BHU Wi-Fi uRouter, which is only distributed in China. Smart Wi-Fi is the latest family of Linksys routers and includes more than 20 different models…

Tao Sauvage
Blogs | RESEARCH | August 17, 2016

Multiple Vulnerabilities in BHU WiFi “uRouter”

A Wonderful (and !Secure) Router from China The BHU WiFi uRouter, manufactured and sold in China, looks great – and it contains multiple critical vulnerabilities. An unauthenticated attacker could bypass authentication, access sensitive information stored in its system logs, and in the worst case, execute OS commands on the router with root privileges. In addition, the uRouter ships with hidden users, SSH enabled by default and a hardcoded root password…and injects a third-party JavaScript file into all users’ HTTP traffic. In this blog post, we cover the main security issues…

Tao Sauvage
Blogs | INSIGHTS | March 22, 2016

Inside the IOActive Silicon Lab: Interpreting Images

In the post “Reading CMOS layout,” we discussed understanding CMOS layout in order to reverse-engineer photographs of a circuit to a transistor-level schematic. This was all well and good, but I glossed over an important (and often overlooked) part of the process: using the photos to observe and understand the circuit’s actual geometry. Optical Microscopy Let’s start with brightfield optical microscope imagery. (Darkfield microscopy is rarely used for semiconductor work.) Although reading lower metal layers on modern deep-submicron processes does usually require electron microscopy, optical microscopes still have…

Andrew Zonenberg
Blogs | INSIGHTS | July 30, 2015

Saving Polar Bears When Banner Grabbing

As most of us know, the Earth’s CO2 levels keep rising, which directly contributes to the melting of our pale blue dot’s icecaps. This is slowly but surely making it harder for our beloved polar bears to keep on living. So, it’s time for us information security professionals to help do our part. As we all know, every packet traveling over the Internet is processed by power hungry CPUs. By simply sending fewer packets, we can consume less electricity while still get our banner grabbing, and subsequently our work,…

Vincent Berg
Blogs | INSIGHTS | June 14, 2013

Red Team Testing: Debunking Myths and Setting Expectations

The term “cyber” seems to be overused in every corner of the information security industry. Now there is a new buzz phrase in computer security, “red team engagements.” Supposedly (to get “cyber” on you), you can have a red team test, and it will help move your organization in the correct “cyber direction.” But what is red team testing really? And what is it not? In this post I’ll try to make some sense of this potent term. The red team concept has been around for ages. It…

Ian Amit
Blogs | INSIGHTS | February 6, 2013

The Anatomy of Unsecure Configuration: Reality Bites

As a penetration tester, I encounter interesting problems with network devices and software. The most common problems that I notice in my work are configuration issues. In today’s security environment, we can accept that a zero-day exploit results in system compromise because details of the vulnerability were unknown earlier. But, what about security issues and problems that have been around for a long time and can’t seem to be eradicated completely? I believe the existence of these types of issues shows that too many administrators and developers are not paying…

Aditya K. Sood

Commonalities In Vehicle Vulnerabilities

With the connected car becoming commonplace in the market, vehicle cybersecurity continues to grow more important every year. At the forefront of security research, IOActive has amassed real-world vulnerability data illustrating the general issues and potential solutions to the cybersecurity threats today’s vehicles face.

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