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Blogs | EDITORIAL | November 14, 2017

Treat the Cause, not the Symptoms!

With the publication of the National Audit Office report on WannaCry fresh off the press, I think it’s important that we revisit what it actually means. There are worrying statements within the various reports around preventative measures that could have been taken. In particular, where the health service talks about treating the cause, not the symptom, you would expect that ethos to cross functions, from the primary caregivers to the primary security services.  I read that the NHS Digital team carried out an onsite cyber assessment of 88…

Neil Haskins
Blogs | RESEARCH | February 3, 2016

Brain Waves Technologies: Security in Mind? I Don’t Think So

INTRODUCTION Just a decade ago, electroencephalography (EEG) was limited to the inner rooms of hospitals, purely for medical purposes. Nowadays, relatively cheap consumer devices capable of measuring brain wave activity are in the hands of curious kids, researchers, artists, creators, and hackers. A few of the applications of this technology include: ·       EEG-controlled Exoskeleton Hope for ALS Sufferers ·       Brain-controlled Drone ·       Brain Waves Used as a Biometric Authentication Mechanism ·       Translating Soldier Thoughts to Computer Commands (Military) ·       Detect Battlefield Threats via Brain Waves

Alejandro Hernandez
Blogs | INSIGHTS | August 20, 2013

FDA Medical Device Guidance

Last week the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finally released a couple of important documents. The first being their guidance on using radio frequency wireless technology in medical devices (replacing a draft from January 3,2007), and a second being their new (draft) guidance on premarket submission for management of cybersecurity in medical devices. The wireless technology guidance document seeks to address many of the risks and vulnerabilities that have been disclosed in medical devices (embedded or otherwise) in recent years – in particular those with embedded RF wireless functionality…

Gunter Ollmann
Blogs | INSIGHTS | June 14, 2013

Red Team Testing: Debunking Myths and Setting Expectations

The term “cyber” seems to be overused in every corner of the information security industry. Now there is a new buzz phrase in computer security, “red team engagements.” Supposedly (to get “cyber” on you), you can have a red team test, and it will help move your organization in the correct “cyber direction.” But what is red team testing really? And what is it not? In this post I’ll try to make some sense of this potent term. The red team concept has been around for ages. It…

Ian Amit
Blogs | INSIGHTS | June 11, 2013

Tools of the Trade – Incident Response, Part 1: Log Analysis

There was a time when I imagined I was James Bond zip lining into a compromised environment, equipped with all kinds of top-secret tools. I would wave my hands over the boxes needing investigation, use my forensics glasses to extract all malware samples, and beam them over to Miss Moneypenny (or “Q” for APT concerns) for analysis. I would produce the report from my top-notch armpit laser printer in minutes. I was a hero. As wonderful as it sounds, this doesn’t ever happen in real life. Instead of sporting a…

Wim Remes
Blogs | INSIGHTS | March 25, 2013

SQL Injection in the Wild

As attack vectors go, very few are as significant as obtaining the ability to insert bespoke code in to an application and have it automatically execute upon “inaccessible” backend systems. In the Web application arena, SQL Injection vulnerabilities are often the scariest threat that developers and system administrators come face to face with (albeit way too regularly).  In fact the OWASP Top-10 list of Web threats lists SQL Injection in first place. More often than not, when security professionals…

Gunter Ollmann
Blogs | INSIGHTS | February 26, 2013

“Broken Hearts”: How plausible was the Homeland pacemaker hack?

[1] I watched the TV show Homeland for the first time a few months ago. This particular episode had a plot twist that involved a terrorist remotely hacking into the pacemaker of the Vice President of the United States. People follow this show religiously, and there were articles questioning the plausibility of the pacemaker hack. Physicians were questioned as to the validity of the hack and were quoted saying that this is not possible in the real world [2]. In my professional opinion, the episode…

Barnaby Jack
Blogs | INSIGHTS | January 30, 2013

Energy Security 2013: Less Say, More Do

Due to recent attacks on many forms of energy management technology ranging from supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) networks and automation hardware devices to smart meters and grid network management systems, companies in the energy industry are increasing significantly the amount they spend on security. However, I believe these organizations are still spending money in the wrong areas of security.  Why? The illusion of security, driven by over-engineered and over-funded policy and control frameworks and the mindset that security must be regulated before making a start is preventing, not…

Trevor Niblock
Blogs | INSIGHTS | January 7, 2013

The Demise of Desktop Antivirus

Are you old enough to remember the demise of the ubiquitous CompuServe and AOL CD’s that used to be attached to every computer magazine you ever brought between the mid-80’s and mid-90’s? If you missed that annoying period of Internet history, maybe you’ll be able to watch the death of desktop antivirus instead. 65,000 AOL CD’s as art Just as dial-up subscription portals and proprietary “web browsers” represent a yester-year view of the Internet, desktop antivirus is similarly being confined…

Gunter Ollmann
Blogs | INSIGHTS | December 20, 2012

Exploits, Curdled Milk and Nukes (Oh my!)

Throughout the second half of 2012 many security folks have been asking “how much is a zero-day vulnerability worth?” and it’s often been hard to believe the numbers that have been (and continue to be) thrown around. For the sake of clarity though, I do believe that it’s the wrong question… the correct question should be “how much do people pay for working exploits against zero-day vulnerabilities?” The answer in the majority of cases tends to be “it depends on who’s buying and what the vulnerability is” regardless of the…

Gunter Ollmann

Thoughts on Supply Chain Integrity

In this video presentation, John Sheehy, VP, Sales and Strategy at IOActive, shares his comprehensive view on the myriad considerations facing business as they undertake supply chain integrity assessments, focused on securing operations.

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IOACTIVE CORPORATE OVERVIEW (PDF)